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Minnesota State University, Mankato

Minnesota State University, Mankato

Sociology

Page address: http://grad.mnsu.edu/programs/bulletin/sociology.html

College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Department of Sociology and Corrections
113 Armstrong Hall
507-389-1561
Fax: 507-389-5615 

http://sbs.mnsu.edu/soccorr/graduateprogram/
 

Sociology and Corrections offers graduate work leading to the Master of Arts in Sociology and Sociology: College Teaching Emphasis; and, the Master of Science in Sociology: Corrections and Sociology: Human Services Planning and Administration. All of these programs emphasize flexibility and individual attention by a broadly trained faculty with a diversity of interests and a commitment to real-world problems and solutions.

General Admission Requirements

Students must meet the general admission requirements of the College of Graduate Studies and Research to be admitted to their program.

General Admission Requirements for the Department of Sociology and Corrections

In addition to courses specific to each program, admission to the graduate programs in this department require a grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale for the undergraduate degree. Applicants are also expected to submit

  1. 3 letters of reference
  2. a resume or curriculum vitae
  3. a statement of purpose
  4. a sample of written work

Students not meeting the requirements may be admitted conditionally; such conditions to be determined by the program admission committee. Forms for the recommendations are available from the department. The application and transcripts should be sent to the College of Graduate Studies and Research. The letters of recommendation, curriculum vitae or resume, statement of purpose, and writing sample should be sent directly to the Department of Sociology and Corrections.

Admission to the Sociology MA program

In addition to the general admission requirements noted above, admission to the Sociology MA program requires 24 quarter credits or 18 semester credits of sociology including courses in sociological theory, research methods and statistics

Admission to the Sociology: Corrections MS program
In addition to the general requirements noted above, admission to the Sociology: Corrections MS program requires 24 quarter credits or 18 semester credits in the social and behavioral sciences including courses in sociology, criminology, penology and research methods or statistics.

Admission to the Sociology: Human Services Planning and Administration MS program
In addition to the general admission requirements noted above, admission to the Sociology: Human Services Planning and Administration MS program requires 24 quarter credit hours or 18 semester credit hours of social and behavioral sciences courses, including a research methods or statistics class.

Sociology MA: General
(Thesis Plan - 33 credits)

The Master of Arts in Sociology: General is designed for the person seeking a comprehensive, sociological understanding of the social world. The program strongly emphasizes the diversity of sociological theories and research methodologies. Upon this foundation, the program provides an in-depth apprenticeship in the discipline of sociology by combining core courses, diverse subject areas, and the opportunity for intensive academic specialization. This program is ideally suited for those who wish to continue their education, earn a Ph.D. and plan a career in college teaching or research. It is also appropriate for those who choose to pursue careers applying sociology in a variety of work settings.

Required Core (18 credits)

  • SOC 602 – Seminar in Social Organization (3)
  • SOC 603 – Seminar in Social Psychology (3)
  • SOC 604 – Seminar in Sociological Statistics (3)
  • SOC 605 – Seminar in Research Methods (3)
  • SOC 606 – Seminar in Sociological Theory (3)
  • SOC 699 – Thesis (3)

Required Electives (15 credits)
Any 500/600 level elective courses selected in consultation with an advisor.

Sociology MA: College Teaching Emphasis
http://sbs.mnsu.edu/soccorr/graduateprogram/teachingemphasis.html

(Thesis Plan – 33 credits)

The Master of Arts Sociology: College Teaching is designed for students planning an academic career. MA graduates are eligible for most academic appointments at the community college level. This degree emphasis also provides ideal preparation for students planning to seek a Ph.D. and an academic career at the college or university level. It requires a minimum of 33 credits in sociology .

Required Core (24-27 credits):

  • Soc 602 (3) Seminar in Social Organization
  • Soc 603 (3) Seminar in Social Psychology
  • Soc 604 (3) Seminar in Sociological Statistics
  • Soc 605 (3) Seminar in Research Methods
  • Soc 606 (3) Seminar in Sociological Theory
  • Soc 610 (3) Seminar in Teaching Sociology
  • Soc 696 (3-6) Internship: College Teaching
  • Soc 699 (3) Thesis

Elective Sociology Courses (9 - 12 credits)
Sociology courses at the 500 or 600 level with approval of advisor.

Sociology: Corrections MS
(Thesis Plan - 33 credits)
(Alternate Plan Paper – 34 credits)

The Master of Science in Sociology: Corrections is designed for a person seeking a leadership role in the active critique and transformation of corrections practice. A graduate of this program will have dedication to the application of the sociological perspective to correctional practices, a thorough understanding of the correctional system, a commitment to improving the justice system, and the ability to facilitate and maintain necessary processes for change. The graduate of this program is further expected to promote a commitment to the principles of social justice, respect, tolerance, dignity, and worth of all persons within corrections and the community at large.

 

Required Core (21 credits)

  • SOC 602 – Seminar in Social Organization (3)
  • SOC 603 – Seminar in Social Psychology (3)
  • SOC 605 – Seminar in Sociological Research (3)
  • SOC 606 – Seminar in Sociological Theory (3)
  • SOC 607 – Program Evaluation (3)
  • COR 608    Leadership and Transformation in Corrrections (3)
  • COR 647 – Correctional Theory & Practice (3)

Required Electives (9-11credits)
Any 500/600 level Elective courses selected in consultation with an advisor. A list of approved electives is available in the department.

Required Thesis or Alternate Plan Paper

  • COR 694  Alternate Plan Paper (1-2)
  • COR 699  Thesis (3)

Sociology: Human Services Planning and Administration MS
(Thesis Plan - 33 credits)
(Alternate Plan Paper – 34 credits)

The Master of Science in Sociology: Human Services Planning and Administration is designed for a person seeking a leadership role as an administrator in the field of human services. The graduate of this program will have a solid grounding in the knowledge, values, and skills appropriate for a broad range of human services programs. The program especially encourages creative and critical thinking skills which enable the graduate to produce positive changes in organizations.

Required Core (21 credits)

  • SOC 517 – Program Administration (3)
  • SOC 566 – Program Planning (3)
  • SOC 602 – Seminar in Social Organization (3)
  • SOC 603 – Seminar in Social Psychology (3)
  • SOC 605 – Seminar in Sociological Research (3)
  • SOC 606 – Seminar in Sociological Theory (3)
  • SOC 607 – Program Evaluation (3)

Required Electives (9-11 credits)
Any 500/600 level Elective courses selected in consultation with an advisor.

Required Thesis or Alternate Plan Paper

  • SOC 694 Alternate Plan Paper (1-2)
  • SOC 699 Thesis (1-3)

 

Correctional Leadership Graduate Certificate

The Correctional Leadership Graduate Certificate is granted upon completion of 15 credits of coursework in Corrections and Program Planning/Administration. The Certificate program includes five specific courses that are designed to build and enhance skills in the areas of leadership, correctional policy development, theory, and program administration and evaluation. The goal of this certificate is to develop transformational leaders that can become a force for positive change in corrections and the broader criminal justice system. This program is fully online and is designed to support the ability of working professionals to meet their educational goals without disrupting their careers. Admission to the Certificate program requires formal application to the Graduate College, and the same admissions criteria found for the Master of Science in Corrections program apply.

CORR/SOC 517

Program Administration

SOC 566

Program Planning

CORR 571

New Directions In correctional Policy:  Transforming Practice

CORR 608

Leadership and Transformation in Corrections

CORR 647

Correctional Theory and Practice

 

Sociology

SOC 502 (3) Medical Sociology

Introduces students to central topics in medical sociology including social factors responsible for health outcomes, social construction of health and illness health inequalities, evolution of the social institution of medicine, and/or issues related to race/ethnicity, social class and gender.

SOC 503 (3) Sociology of Mental Health

This course brings a sociological perspective to the understanding of mental health and illness. Students review the history and the perception of mental illness in western society, and critically examine how social factors influence the definition and the responses to mental disorders.

SOC 504 (3) Sociology of Aging

Social and gerontological focus later in life.  Problems and prospects of growing old in the United States.

SOC 505 (3) Sociology of Death

Study of the structure of human response to death, dying, and bereavement in their socio-cultural, interpersonal, and personal context. Formation of children's perception of death, functions of the funeral, euthanasia, and suicide are among the topics to be discussed.

SOC 507 (3) Population Dynamics

The course will acquaint students with dynamic forces operating in the field of population and development. Includes an introduction to basic theories and techniques of population analysis, with coverage of global economic forces: fertility, morality, and migration. The causes and consequences of overpopulation are discussed with special attention to resource depletion and food shortages.

SOC 508 (3) Family Life Dynamics

An overview and analysis of major aspects of the American family, including cohabitation, mate selection, parenting, and changes in marriage, family, and sex role dynamics since 1970.

SOC 509 (3) Family Violence

Various forms of family violence including dating violence, intimate partner violence, and child abuse; social theory, empirical research and social policy on family violence; social context, responses and solutions.

SOC 517 (3) Program Administration

Implications of sociological knowledge for the administration of Human Services programs. Theoretical and practical aspects of administration with the social service systems.

SOC 520 (3) Identity Work in Women's Reentry Experiences

 

Applies sociological theories of identity to the experience of women being released from prison.  Taught at a women’s prison and integrates Minnesota State Mankato students with students drawn from the educational program located within the women’s prison.

SOC 523 (3) Complex Organizations

Analysis of the development, structure, and functioning of social processes in large-scale, formal organizations.

SOC 525 (3) Social Movements

Survey of major sociological perspectives on social movements, including theoretical approaches and empirical research on the causes, processes, and outcomes of social movements.

SOC 530 (3) Sociology of Globalization

Overview of the role of the United States in an increasingly globalized society with a focus on economic and political inequality, the class structure, the labor process, race and gender relations, the global dimensions of capitalism, and modern crisis tendencies.

SOC 541 (3) Social Deviance

Sociological perspectives on social deviance; overview of theoretical approaches; emphasis on symbolic interactionism; issues of social control; research examples and policy implications.

SOC 542 (3) Criminology

A critical consideration of myths concerning crime, perspectives on crime and their assumptions, current criminology theory, and construction of alternative explanations related to crime.

SOC 546 (3) Race, Culture & Ethnicity

Study of minority racial and cultural groups in US society. An examination of how the lives of the members of these groups are affected by racism, prejudice, and discrimination.

SOC 558 (3) Sociological Theory

An overview of sociological theory that surveys the classical tradition and emphasizes contemporary theories including functionalism, conflict theory, rational choice theory, and symbolic interactionism, as well as recent trends in theoretical developments.

SOC 560 (3 ) Environmental Sociology

Examines the sociological relationship between people and the environment including: ways various societies view the environment, social changes from ecological degradation, and solutions to environmental problems. Topics may include a sociological analysis of climate change, agriculture, and resource extraction.

SOC 561 (3) Urban Sociology

A survey of sociological theory and research on the ecology, demography, and social organization of the urban community. Presents a sociological interpretation of the development of urban society and how the process of urbanization affects the basic societal institutions and individual behavior.

SOC 563 (3) Social Stratification

An overview of the causes, processes and consequences of social stratification in society. Includes an overview of classical statements about stratification and focuses on social inequalities rooted in social class structures, the organization of political power, and social hierarchies based on race and gender differences in society.

SOC 565 (3) Law & Chemical Dependency

Addresses aspects of criminal and civil law pertinent to substance abuse.

SOC 566 (3) Program Planning

Theoretical and practical aspects of the planning process within social service systems. Examines the social context of planning and the use of a sociological knowledge base for planning in human services.

SOC 569 (3) Survey Research

Techniques of survey research, interview, and questionnaire construction, field administration, and sampling methodology.

SOC 570 (3) Sociology of Parent-Child Interaction

Examines parent-child relationships in societal context; socialization theories; classic and contemporary research; parenting applications.

SOC 579 (3) Sociological Ethnography

Examination of ethnographic methodologies in sociology with emphasis on analytic, performance, and autoethnography. Exploration of ethics in ethnography, visual sociology, and first-hand experience in both crafting and presenting ethnographic works. Pre: SOC 101 or SOC 101W; SOC 201 or similar social science research course with instructor permission.

SOC 580 (3) Qualitative Methods

Workshop based course:  Students learn participant observation, focused interviews, and qualitative analysis through engagement in field research projects. 
Pre: SOC 101 or SOC 101W; SOC 201 or similar social science research course with instructor permission.

SOC 582 (3) Social Change

Analysis of social forces and processes involved in changing norms, values, and structures in traditional and modern societies. Examines both planned and unplanned change.

SOC 583 (3) The Family and Society

An examination of theory development and research findings about family systems with a special emphasis on societal influences (social, economic, political) on the changing family.

SOC 584 (3) Sociology of Religion

Analysis of the structures, functions, and origins of religion, its relationship to other social institutions, and its role in modern secular society. Examines processes of individual religiosity and explores current religious movements and trends.

SOC 585 (2-6) Selected Topics

Topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be retaken for credit if topic varies.

SOC 590 (1-3) Workshop

Workshop topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be retaken for credit.

SOC 591 (1-6) In-Service

SOC 593 (3) Applied Sociology

Applying sociology to create a career and make the world a better place. Explores how to investigate and implement solutions to problems of social process and social organization in workplace or other settings including community agencies, government, business, and other social institutions.

SOC 601 (3) Topics in Sociology

Topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be repeated for credit if topic varies.

SOC 602 (3) Seminar: Social Organization

Macro-analysis of society as a system. Examines cultural, structural, behavioral, and ecological patterns of organization. Includes a focus on complex organizations.

SOC 603 (3) Seminar: Social Psychology

A survey and analysis of major scientific approaches to human social behavior.

SOC 604 (3) Seminar: Social Statistics

Appreciation of basic multivariable methods in the analysis of sociological data. Includes computer applications using SPSS and application to various social issues.

SOC 605 (3) Seminar: Social Research

Advanced-level introduction or review of social science research methods, including entire research process: problem definition, literature review, hypothesis development, method development, data collection, analysis, interpretation, and communication; focuses on quantitative methods.

SOC 606 (3) Seminar in Sociological Theory

An overview of sociological theory that spans the classical and contemporary traditions within the discipline and focuses on current theoretical issues and controversies within the field.

SOC 607 (3) Program Evaluation

Quantitative and naturalistic paradigms as a knowledge base for program evaluation. Examines the social context and implication of evaluation to discuss mode and ethical considerations. Includes applied contribution of empirical research and current issues and trends.

SOC 609 (3) Seminar: Thesis Writing

Exploration of intellectual craftsmanship, existing models of thesis scholarship, the generic elements of the thesis, the writing process, and common obstacles to thesis completion in a collaborative and supportive context designed to foster significant progress on the thesis project throughout the semester.

SOC 677 (1-3) Individual Study

A maximum of six credits is applicable toward a degree program.

SOC 691 (1-4) In-Service

Topics vary as arranged by students and instructor. May be retaken for credit.

SOC 694 (1-2) Alternate Plan Paper

Preparation of an alternate plan paper under supervision of the student's graduate advisor. Prerequisite: must be enrolled in the MS program in Sociology.

SOC 695 (1-6) Internship: Human Services

Prerequisite: consent

SOC 696 (1-6) Internship: College Teaching

The internship in college teaching is designed to provide opportunity to acquire supervised teaching experience in the college classroom and to explore a career in college teaching. It also serves as a vehicle for the student to become more aware of personal strengths and identify areas in which further growth is needed.

Prerequisite: consent

SOC 697 (1-12) Internship: Sociology

The internship is designed to provide opportunity to apply classroom learning, to practice and enhance skills, to experience professional socialization, and to explore a career. It also serves as a vehicle for the student to become more aware of personal strengths and identify areas in which further growth is needed.

Prerequisite: consent

SOC 699 (1-3) Thesis

Corrections

CORR 517 (3) Program Administration

Implications of sociological knowledge for the administration of human services programs. Theoretical and practical aspects of administration with the social service systems.

CORR 541 (3) Social Deviance

Sociological perspective on social deviance; overview of theoretical approaches; emphasis on symbolic interactionism; issues of social control; research examples and policy implications.

CORR 542 (3) Criminology

A critical consideration of myths concerning crime, perspectives on crime and their assumptions, current criminology theory, and construction of alternative explanations related to crime.

CORR 543 (3) Penology

Addresses the justifications for punishment, the historical development of punishment, the legal and policy issues concerning capital punishment, and the use of incarceration as a response to crime.

CORR 544 (3) Women in the Criminal Justice System

This course focuses on the experiences of women in the criminal justice system-as victims, offenders, and professionals. Women's involvement in this system (whether they were a defendant, an attorney, an inmate, a correctional officer of a crime victim) has often been overlooked or devalued. The goal of this course is to bring the special needs and contributions of women in the criminal justice system into sharper focus.

CORR 547 (3) Community Corrections

Philosophy, historical developments, and theoretical basis of probation, parole, and other community corrections programs. Evaluation of traditional and innovative programs in Community Corrections.

CORR 548 (3) Correctional Law

Examines the rights of inmates, probationers, and parolees.

CORR 549 (3) Correctional Counseling

Principles and methods of individual and group counseling with juvenile and adult offenders; development of interpersonal helping skills.

CORR 551 (3) Law & Justice in Society

A critical look at the construction of the concepts of law and justice as it operates in the United States and an application of the principles of justice to community issues.

CORR 552 (3) Victimology

Historical overview of characteristics of victims, victim-offender relationships, societal victimization, victim's rights and services, and restorative justice.

CORR 553 (3) Treatment Methods in Corrections

Examination of major correctional treatment models, e.g., individual and group counseling approaches, behavior modifications, reality therapy, and transactional analysis. Considerations in planning, implementation, and evaluating juvenile and adult treatment programs. Critical evaluation of research on the effectiveness of various treatment methods.

CORR 559 (3) Issues in Corrections

A critical examination of current issues in the correctional field.

CORR 565 (3) Law & Chemical Dependency

Addresses aspects of criminal and civil law pertinent to substance abuse.

Prerequisite: HLTH 225 or PSYC 73

CORR 571 (3) New Directions in Correctional Policy: Transforming Practice

A comprehensive historical and cross-cultural study of social policy analysis, the transforming role correctional policy formation plays in correctional practice, and the process of policy change and the mechanisms leaders can employ to encourage effective and ethical social policy.

CORR 585 (2-6) Selected Topics

Topics vary as announced in class schedule. May be retaken for credit if topic varies.

CORR 591 (1-6) In-Service

Topics vary as arranged by students and instructor. May be retaken for credit.

CORR 607 (3) Program Evaluation

Quantitative and naturalistic paradigms as a knowledge base for program evaluation. Examines the social context and implication of evaluation to discuss mode and ethical considerations. Includes applied contribution of empirical research and current issues and trends.

CORR 608 (3) Leadership and Transformation in Corrections

An examination of leadership skills fostering efficient processes and satisfying human relationships in transforming correctional practice. Recent innovations in the correctional field will provide case studies of effective leadership, the process of transformation and emerging best practice in corrections.

CORR 647 (3) Correctional Theory & Practice

Critical analysis of the relationship between causal theory and correctional practice.

CORR 677 (1-3) Individual Study

CORR 694 (1-2) Alternate Plan Paper

Preparation of an alternate plan paper under supervision of the student's graduate advisor. Prerequisite: must be enrolled in the MS program in Sociology: Corrections.

CORR 698 (1-6) Internship

The graduate-level internship in Corrections is designed to provide opportunity to apply classroom learning, practice and enhance research and administrative skills, and experience professional socialization.

CORR 699 (1-3) Thesis